FAQs

Applying 

Program Information

Program Costs & Financial Aid

 

applying

Q: When do I need to apply for the program?
A:
To be guaranteed a place, apply by mid-February, as this is when the most popular programs tend to run out of spaces. We have spaces available into March on some programs, but others fill faster. Applying early is recommended to assure a place in the program. If you apply by the closing date, we will, however, work hard to fit you in if we possibly can. Applications open in October.

Q: How do I apply?
A:
Application processing, including fee payments, is handled by ASU’s Study Abroad Office

Q: What qualifications do I need to be accepted into the program?
A:
You must be at least 18 years of age, have a minimum GPA of 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale) and be in good standing with your home institution. Generally, if you meet this standard and apply by the due date there is every reason to expect you will be accepted into the program. Non-ASU students must provide a recent transcript with their applications. We select students mainly in the order in which they apply. 

Q: I have low grades or am on academic probation: Is that a problem?
A:
Students with a GPA below 2.5 or in poor standing for any other reason are required to submit two letters of recommendation (preferably from current professors) with their application, in support of their suitability as applicants. Submit the materials to the SHESC study abroad program staff

Q: I’m not from ASU. Can I participate?
A: Yes. We very much welcome non-ASU students into our programs. However, if you are not from ASU, you must first apply to be admitted as a non-degree ASU student (cost $25-50); this is for all programs. That means while you are participating in the program you will be an admitted ASU student. Once you have been admitted to ASU (this usually takes less than 24 hours) you will receive an ‘ASURITE’ login that will allow you to apply to the study abroad program. You will be responsible for making arrangements if you wish to transfer that credit to your home institution, although our program assistant will certainly help with everything we can from our end to make it easy. Summer applicants can start applying January 1, because this is when you can first apply for admission as a non-degree student. If you are seriously interested in attending the study abroad and concerned about getting a space reserved, please contact the academic program coordinator, and we will work with you to make sure a space is set aside until January. 

Q: I'm an international student not from ASU and not living or studying in the U.S. at present. Can I participate?
A: Yes. We welcome students from outside the U.S. However, it is your responsibility to see what visa requirements the destination country has for your home country. You still need to apply to ASU as a non-degree ASU student (see above). If you have questions, please contact the academic program coordinator. This generally works best if you are not planning to enter the U.S. but rather go straight from your home country to the country in which the program is being held and meet the group there.

Steps to Applying

Detailed information on applying to an ASU study abroad program is available on the ASU Study Abroad Office Web site.

Note: Be sure to download the Steps to Study Abroad for a step-by-step guide to completing your application.

Q: When do I need to apply for the program?
A:
Each program has a unique application deadline, so be sure to refer to the complete list of program deadlines available on the ASU Study Abroad Office Web site for the most current details on your particular program.

Note: Applying early is recommended to ensure a place in the program. Applications for summer programs typically open in October. 

If you are a non-ASU student you will need to first apply to ASU as a non-degree-seeking student before you can apply to the study abroad/field school program(s).

To do that, go to the Nondegree Student Admission page and follow the directions. You will need to apply for the semester (ex., fall, spring, summer) that the program(s) is running. It should only take a few days for you to receive your ASUrite ID and password. This is the information you will use to apply to the program.

Once you receive your login information, you can click the link below (or the "Apply Now" link on the program webpages) and click the "ASUrite Login" button to start the application process.

Q: How do I apply for a study abroad program?
A:
Application processing, including fee payments, is handled by the ASU Study Abroad Office.  

To apply, go to the following sites:

Note: if you are interested in New Zealand and Fiji, you must apply to both programs separately

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general program information

Q: What are the programs really like?
A:
Our programs are adventurous, environmentally and socially oriented, active and academically rigorous. They demand a high degree of commitment and involvement from students. We spend at least half our time in the field. We build relevant activities into our schedule to get students into many of the best parts of the country, be they bridge climbing, kayaking, hiking, swimming with dolphins, cultural events or otherwise exploring so students don’t miss out on the best that the places we visit have to offer. Over the years we have worked hard to get the right balance between time studying and time off, because both are very important to everyone getting the most out of their experience. To meet the goals of both it means long, busy, hectic days. These are not “immersion” programs. While we do make time to talk with and get to know the “locals,” and on many programs we have short homestays built into the experience, we spend much of our time with the ASU group, including the faculty and other students. As a result you will come back with very strong friendships with other ASU students (some of the strongest of your life), as well as knowing some ASU faculty well. We are also usually a diverse group, with different majors, and that diversity is what makes the dynamics of our programs interesting.

Q: Will I have free time?
A:
The program itineraries include group activities, some of which are tourist staples (see the program itineraries). We work hard to get the right balance between class time and free time and students will have some time to explore and experience, some free days to travel and some time to catch up on laundry. But otherwise, it’s a full-on 24/7 travel and academic experience. Also, it is emphatically not a vacation. We recommend for this reason that students expecting a vacation experience travel before or after the program for this purpose.

Q: How many credit hours can and must I take?
A:
There are a minimum number of credit hours students must take on each program: six credit hours in London, China, Australia + Fiji, France, New Zealand and Guatemala, and three in Fiji.

Q: Does this program work with my major? Can I attend as a freshman?
A:
Our program topics generally transect the main thematic foci of our school: health, culture, environment, globalization, long-term history, science and technology and cities. The programs are designed to be general, though, in that no prior knowledge of the subject areas is assumed and the courses and programs are very suitable for first year, as well as more senior, students. We have majors of all sorts participating and the programs are designed to support a wide variety of interests, such as business, culture and identity, English, law, journalism, communication, nursing or the social sciences, including global health and anthropology. The best prerequisites are curiosity, open-mindedness and a sense of adventure. 

Q: How can I select and enroll for courses?
A:
You will be asked your course selections when you apply, but there will be follow-up on this once you are in the program and you have a chance to change your mind. This can occur later than for on-campus classes, so patience is sometimes required.

Q: Is attendance at classes mandatory?
A:
Yes.

Q: I have other questions. Who can I ask?
A:
For questions about applying, being accepted, payments, refunds, program fees, credit transfers, course enrollments, budgeting, travel documentation and general travel questions, contact the ASU Study Abroad Office. For other questions, contact our school’s program staff directly.

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acceptance & orientation

Q: How will I know if I have been accepted into the program?
A:
You will receive an e-mail via your ASU e-mail account. Contact the ASU Study Abroad Office if you have any problems in the application process, as they can help. Note: To be considered for acceptance, you must meet all program eligibility requirements and must complete all material submissions, signature documents and application questionnaires listed in your online program application on the Study Abroad Office Web site.

Q: Can I get contact info for other students on the program?
A:
You can meet other students on the program by attending the pre-departure orientation.  

Q: Must I attend and/or view the pre-departure orientation?
A: 
Yes, you are required to complete all pre-departure orientation activities. First, once you have been accepted into the program, you must view the online pre-departure orientation available to you on the program's Blackboard site. This consists of a presentation and a quiz that follows. In addition to the online orientation, there will be an in-person orientation that is required for all students. You will be notified directly by the School of Human Evolution and Social Change study abroad staff on the precise date and time of the pre-departure orientation meeting. Have questions ready. Note: Please pay very special attention to the announcements on the Blackboard site you will be enrolled in after you are accepted into the program. The necessary information will be on that site. If you are unable to attend orientation, you must notify us immediately to determine how best to proceed.

For more information, contact shesc.undergrad@asu.edu.

Q: Where do I get my readings?
A:
This varies by program. You will be sent information by e-mail and this will also be posted on the program Blackboard site as it becomes available. Some programs use textbooks, others readers, others post on Blackboard. If you bring a laptop, you can download most of the readings and carry them electronically. 

Q: Who do I ask for assistance with special accommodations?
A:
If you need assistance with special accommodations, please contact us as soon as possible so we can assist as best as we can. The degree to which we can make accommodations varies by program. 

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travel & preparation

Q: Do I need a visa? A passport?
A:
You do need a passport, and it should be at least six months from expiring when you enter the country. Your travel destination will determine whether or not you will need a visa. All students are responsible for double-checking their own passport and visa requirements. 

The ASU Tempe campus houses a Passport Application Facility at Tempe Center. This facility allows students to update or access a passport for out-of-country travel. For more information, see the U.S. Passport Acceptance Office website.

AUSTRALIA: To travel to Australia, U.S. citizens must also have an ETA (Electronic Travel Authority) that is issued before arrival in Australia. Your travel agent can issue an ETA free of charge, or you can arrange one yourself (for a ~$15 fee) online at www.eta.immi.gov.au. Note that you will not be traveling as a “student” (which would mean you are registering at an in-country university) but are entering the country as a “tourist.”

LONDON: A "letter" is required for entry to England, and we will take care of this and issue you the letter prior to departure. Make sure you carry the letter with your passport. This has no additional cost.

CHINA: A visa is required to travel to China and should be organized well in advance of travel dates. As soon as you are accepted into the program, you will get detailed information about how to apply for your visa. The cost is around $160, and it can take several weeks (although it usually takes 1-2 weeks).

FRANCE: U.S. citizens do not require a visa to enter France as long as the stay is less than 90 days, although you should double-check with your travel agent.

NEW ZEALAND and FIJI: No visa is required for Fiji or New Zealand if you are traveling on a U.S. passport and your stay will be less than 90 days, although you should double-check with your travel agent.

SOUTH AFRICA: No visa is required for South Africa if you are traveling on a U.S. passport and your stay will be less than 90 days, although you should double-check with your travel agent.

GUATEMALA: No visa is required for Guatemala if you are traveling on a U.S. passport and your stay will be less than 90 days, although you should double-check with your travel agent.

To learn about visa requirements for specific study abroad regions, see the following:

Australia — http://www.immi.gov.au/visitors/

Fiji — http://www.fijiembassydc.com/default.asp?contentID=521

France — http://www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/en/coming-to-france/getting-a-visa/

London (United Kingdom) — http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/visas-immigration/

New Zealand — http://www.immigration.govt.nz/migrant/stream/visit

China — http://www.china-embassy.org/eng/hzqz

Guatemala — http://www.wordtravels.com/Travelguide/Countries/Guatemala/Visa

Q: Do all students travel to the country on the same flight? Can you help me with my travel arrangements?
A:
The programs begin in-country, at a specified meeting point that we will e-mail to you in late spring. Each student is responsible for getting himself or herself to the meeting point. We will typically arrange an optional group flight from a central departure point (usually Los Angeles or Phoenix) and will advise you of the flight details via e-mail and the program Blackboard. Those details are usually available by mid-February at the latest. It is then your responsibility to book your own ticket with the travel agent who organizes the group flight and make payments directly to them. Or you may choose to travel on another flight, which is also fine. If you are on the group flight you have the advantage of airport pick-ups and drop-offs, as well as traveling with other group members.

Q: Do I need immunizations?
A:
No, not except those recommended for being in the U.S. However, the Center for Disease Control has previously recommended Hepatitis A for anyone traveling outside of the U.S. CDC has an international traveler’s hotline, (404) 332-4559, where you can get additional information (see also www.cdc.gov).

Q: What should I pack?
A:
Once you are accepted into the program, we will provide you with a detailed packing list to help you prepare.

LONDON: Typically, London is cold and wet, regardless of season. Bring pants, jeans, skirts, long- and short-sleeved shirts, a rain jacket, an umbrella and a warm jacket in case. In 2010 we had record sunshine, but to Arizonans the heat was quite bearable. Laundry in London is expensive, so it makes sense to bring a week's worth or more of clothing changes.

NEW ZEALAND: Bring pants, jeans, skirts, long-sleeved shirts, a rain jacket and a warm jacket. Think layering for cold days. Weather in New Zealand can be cold periodically all year around, but expect it to be cold and sometimes wet in May (which is winter in New Zealand), plus indoor heating in New Zealand is often limited. If you spend money on one good travel item, make it a light but extremely rain-proof and wind-resistant jacket, such as made of Gore-Tex and with taped seams. It can be good to bring a set of polypropylene or Capilene-style long underwear. Have at least one set of clothes that you are happy to get really dirty, such as on the homestay; a large travel towel (regular towels take longer to dry); and some good hiking/walking shoes. Helpful, too, are gloves, a scarf and a warm hat. Also, bring a small gift for your home stay family. Tea towels or fridge magnets from home are ideal.

AUSTRALIA: The weather in Australia in May can be chilly (especially in the mountains) but also mild, so bring a warm jacket and a rain jacket. Bring pants, jeans, skirts, long- and short-sleeved shirts, good hiking/walking shoes, shower shoes and a large travel towel (regular towels take longer to dry). In 2009 we had a record cold snap, and long underwear, gloves and hats were much needed; most years a good jacket is enough, though.

CHINA: We will be traveling in mid-May through early June. China's weather in Beijing and Shanghai is much like the United States' Northeast, so think warm to sometimes hot and humid. We suggest all students bring comfortable walking shoes (hiking boots are necessary). Students should bring warm weather clothing, like short-sleeve shirts and shorts or skirts in addition to a few long-sleeve shirts and pants for cooler or evening wear. All students should bring a rain jacket, a warm jacket and a hat and sunscreen. A laptop is useful in China because the dorm rooms have Internet access. A cell phone is required but can be purchased in-country.

FIJI: You need casual light clothing. A skirt below the knee for women is required for village visits (men wear long pants or purchase a sulu [wrap] locally to wear over shorts on village visits). Tank tops and spaghetti straps are unacceptable in local villages: ensure you have shirts with shoulder cover (t-shirts are fine). Bring insect repellent with DEET and a large travel towel (regular towels take longer to dry). Tevas, Keens or similar hiking sandals work well. Also, bring a small gift for your home stay family (not alcohol). Tea towels or fridge magnets from home are good.

FRANCE: Summers in France are typically warm (and generally much more humid than Arizona summers), but there could be cooler weather during your trip, especially in the evenings. Be sure to pack good walking shoes or supportive sandals, as this program is intensive on city walking, especially in Paris. Bring pants, shorts, short- and long-sleeved tops, a light jacket or sweatshirt and a rain jacket or umbrella. Layers are recommended during the day. We also recommend that you bring a backpack or tote bag for carrying water and snacks. While there are no formal events on the program, Paris is an elegant city with a lively night scene, so students may want to bring one dressy outfit for their free time.

SOUTH AFRICA: You will need nice clothes if you want to go out clubbing; for work days make sure you have clothes that you can get really dirty (or don't mind getting really dirty). It is winter in South African during our summer, so plan for cold weather.

ALL PROGRAMS: If you like to go out in the evenings, in the cities the dress standards can be quite chic. If you want to party, bring a set or three of nicer clothes. For Australia, New Zealand, Cape Town and London, bring at least one nice outfit for any group outings in the evenings, such as group meals. If you like to go out clubbing, also consider a set of city-chic clothes. Some good basics include swimwear; shower shoes/flip-flops; day-pack; flashlight (Petzl or similar small light especially recommended); sunglasses; writing materials; digital camera; Lonely Planet, Footprint, Moon or Let’s Go guidebooks; water bottle; sunscreen; travel alarm clock or watch with alarm; combination locks for your luggage; plastic Ziplock bags (just handy to have); copies of important documents; and emergency contact information. An MP3 player or similar device can be useful for long bus trips. If you choose to bring a laptop or digital camera, be sure to check the specifications of your equipment—most now have dual-voltage transformers and simply need a plug head adapter for that country (available pre-departure at Radio Shack or in-country).

Should you bring a laptop and/or cell phone? It is an extra concern keeping a laptop safe from damage or theft, and the program staff cannot assume any responsibility for any valuable or fragile items. However, many students bring laptops and find them a benefit well worth the extra hassle. If you are attached to your laptop, you will probably be pleased you brought it. If you prefer not to have the hassle, leave it behind—you won’t need it. A laptop makes the most sense in London, where we are not moving around so much. But this is totally each student's own decision.

Some of the places we visit (except the U.K.) will probably not have cell-phone service because they are remote, so this would mainly only be useful while we are in major cities. If you have an unlocked world phone, you can buy a SIM card to allow you to use your phone in-country at relatively low cost. Some U.S. cell-phone plans allow you to use your phone on roaming while overseas, but note that this can be very expensive. In London you can buy a pay-as-you-go cellphone for less than $20, which is the best way to go. 

Q: What should I leave behind for my parents/emergency contacts?
A:
Leave your contact information, including the final itinerary with all the accommodation contact information, a copy of your airline tickets, a copy of your passport and visa (if applicable) and a print out of the “emergency contact” information page from the program Blackboard site. 

Q: What about telecommunications and internet while I am away?
A: Internet cafes are scattered near our accommodations in the cities and sometimes but not always at other locations. Thus you may not have access to e-mail while we are at some of our more remote locations. All dormitory rooms in China and London will have Internet access. Thus, it will be easier for you to call home than for people to call you. Having a calling card is the best way to call—you can buy one in the U.S. or purchase them in-country. Calling collect is always an option but usually quite expensive. Almost all of the U.S. long-distance telephone companies (AT&T, MCI and Sprint) have an access code depending on which country you are calling from. It is highly recommended that you obtain the access code of a long distance company before going abroad, as it is very difficult to get this information from abroad. These numbers will connect you directly to an AT&T, Sprint or MCI system, and the call will be charged to your calling card. In some cases, the charge can also go on a credit card. Sam’s and Price Club calling cards purchased in the U.S. are generally the best deals. You can also purchase pre-paid calling cards in-country at a reasonable cost. Sometimes these cards don't work at New Zealand pay phones, in which case you will need to buy local phone cards. For the China program, all students are required to carry a cell phone. You can bring your U.S. cell phone (if it will work in Beijing and Shanghai) or purchase a SIM card or cell phone in-country for about $60. In London, if you have a laptop, you will need to purchase Internet access in your accommodations (bring or buy there on ethernet cable), which is a modest fee. 

Q: How do I get money while I am overseas?
A:
The easiest and most efficient way to get money while in another country is with your ATM/debit card. Most cities have ATM machines and banks. Be sure to contact your bank. Be sure to contact your bank and see about international agreements so you are not charged high fees and to ensure your card is compatible with international systems (such as Plus, Cirrus). Credit cards are good for emergencies and large purchases. It is better to not use your credit card for advances because these carry high charges as well. Travelers’ checks used to be a popular way to transport money while traveling but they are now accepted by few merchants and less than ideal. The best way to get cash in China is through ATMs. In China, credit cards are rarely used. 

Q: Will I have a single, double or triple room? Can I share with my friend?
A:
In London, rooms are normally singles. In China, all of the accommodations are single occupancy. For the other programs, rooms are shared with other participants. Unless you have extenuating circumstances, you should not expect to share a room with a friend; rooming arrangements are made to ensure that you meet new people!

Q: What is the quality of the accommodations?
A:
In London, students have their own rooms either with en suite or shared bathrooms in university dorms, with Internet access. On other programs, students are accommodated in shared rooms usually with their own bathroom. In New Zealand and Australia, we stay in budget-style accommodations, including hotels, backpackers and university hostels. Some places we stay are very comfortable; others are better described as simple or rustic hostels, noting backpackers are a much higher standard of accommodation than is usual in the U.S. and accommodation in the main towns tend to be more comfortable than those on-the-road. However, you need to be prepared variously for communal bathrooms, bunk-bed style sleeping, cold nights and limited facilities, as we stay in different places. Most accommodations will have some cooking and laundry facilities and public phones, and some (but not all) have internet. In New Zealand and Fiji we also spend a small amount of time in homestays, staying in people’s own homes. These homes can be very modest. In Beijing, students will have their own rooms in Beijing Foreign Studies Dormitory. Rooms are air-conditioned and wired with high-speed Internet access. Each room is furnished with a bed, desk, desk chair, bookcase and closet. Bathrooms are communal and single-sex. All dormitories have available a shared lounge and kitchen facilities. In Shanghai, students will likely have a single or shared four-star hotel room.

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funding & financial aid

Q: When are the program fees due?
A:
The ASU Study Abroad Office provides detailed information on the costs associated with study abroad programs, including payment due dates. Please visit their Financing Your Study Abroad Program Web page for details. Note: Be sure to download the Financing Your Study Abroad Program handbook. 

Q: What about cancellation fees and refunds if I have to withdraw from the program?
A:
A copy of the Study Abroad Withdrawal policy is available in the Financing Your Study Abroad Program handbook on the ASU Study Abroad Office Web site. However, no refunds will be granted under any conditions on any monies that have been applied as non-refundable deposits to third-party service providers. Deposit and application fee are non-refundable. 

Q: How much will the program cost? Can I afford to study abroad?
A:
Program fees vary by program, based on destination and program length. Considering students can gain 9 or even 12 credit hours on a summer program and earn required credits, the cost of studying abroad in the summer can be very cost-competitive compared to staying on campus for a semester earning the same number of credits. The costs of the program fee are invariably less than it would cost to travel alone in the country. We gain benefits from reduced costs associated with being in a group. 

Q: What does the program fee actually cover?
A:
The inclusions vary for each of our programs but include in-country transportation unless otherwise specified, required credits and all scheduled group activities and excursions and all accommodations. All programs provide some group meals, although the number varies by circumstance. For example, in Fiji almost all meals are covered; however, in London we provide around six meals but arrange self-catering facilities in the accommodations. The individual program itineraries are suggestive of the number of meals and group activities provided for each program in your program fee, but may be subject to minor adjustments as necessary.   

Q: What else, besides the program fee, do I need to budget for?
A:
Students need to budget for airfares to meet the program in-country; meals (other than group meals); any course materials; and any personal expenses, including telecommunications, internet, laundry, gifts and souvenirs, evenings out and independent travel and activities. How much you need will depend entirely on how much of a "spender" you are. The minimums we have given in the table above are based on surveys of former students after they completed the program and are the least amount people generally spent; many people spend much more.

Airfares have been fluctuating with fuel surcharges, but a reasonable estimate for international airfares is less than $1,200 to London, $1,800 to Guatemala, $1,400 to France, $1,400 to China, $1,200 to New Zealand, $1,300 to Australia and $100-200 for Fiji; this does not necessarily include any domestic flights to Los Angeles (for Fiji, New Zealand and Australia), so remember to add that in also.

The costs of meals and personal expenses are quite difficult to estimate because personal spending preferences vary so markedly from one student to another and also because they are affected by exchange rates. www.xe.com provides current estimates of the exchange rate. When making estimates for personal spending money, realize that eating out rather than shopping at the supermarket and going to clubs in the evenings can really add up and needs to be budgeted in. The cost of entertainment, including food, is rising everywhere. Also the cost of personal travel and activities depends on your interests—bungee jumping on days off is obviously more expensive than visiting museums. Course materials rarely cost more than $100 per program, although vary by class.

Keeping within a pre-planned budget can be a very great challenge for some students, but is an important life skill. We are happy to assist with pre-departure budget planning if you need help. ASU’s Study Abroad Office advisors are also very helpful in this regard and can help students plan budgets.

Q: I have financial aid—will that work?
A: Financial aid works much as it does on campus. Assistance is provided by ASU’s Study Abroad Office. Federal law states financial aid applies to any study abroad program approved by your home institution. It can cover all reasonable costs, including round-trip airfare, program fees, living costs while on the program, passport and visa fees and health insurance. You must complete FAFSA paperwork. You must contact the financial aid department at your home institution to see what steps are required to use your financial aid. 

Q: Do you have any scholarships?
A:
We do not have any program-specific scholarships. ASU and other organizations, however, do. Assistance in locating scholarships is provided by ASU’s Study Abroad Office.

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Specific Program Costs & Planning Information for Study Abroad Programs

 

London

China

Australia + Fiji

New Zealand

Fiji

France

Program Time

22 days

23 days

23 days

23 days

8 days

22 days

Application Deposit
(applied to program fee)

$450

$450

$450

$450

$450

$450

Included # of Credit Hours
(3-6)

6

6

6

6

3

6

Program Fee
(minus $450 deposit; includes stated # of credits of coursework)

$6,970

$6,330

$6,995

$6,740

$2,910

$7,045

Health Insurance

Included

Included

Included

Included

Included

Included

Passport (if needed)

$135

$135

$135

$135

$135

$135

Visa or Travel Authority

$0

~$120-160

~$15

$0

$0

$0

Airfare

~$1,200

~$1,300

~$1,300

~$1,300 

~$150 or ~$1,000*

~$1,400

Meals Provided

Few

Many

Few

Few

Most

Some

Recommended Allowance
(for meals, laundry, Internet, souvenirs and extra spending)

$600–$1,980

$300–$1,150

$600–$1,725

$600–$1,495

$100–$480

$600–$1,980

Laptop Computer Recommended

Yes

Yes

Maybe

Maybe

No

Yes

Course Textbooks

$25

$40

$0

$0

$0

$0

Purchase of In-Country Cell Phone 

$20

$60

~$100

~$100

~$100

$20

Usefulness of a Cell Phone 

Useful

Required

Not so Useful

Not So Useful

Useless

Useful


* Approx. $150 from Australia or New Zealand. If flying from Los Angeles, approx. $1,200. 

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Specific Program Costs & Planning Information for Field Schools

 

Guatemala

Kampsville

New Mexico

Program Time

34 days

41 days

35 days

Application Deposit
(applied to program fee)

$450

$450

$450

Included # of credit hours
(3-6)

6

9

6

Program Fee
(minus $450 deposit; includes stated # of credits of coursework)

$4,945*

$5,805

$3,930*

Health Insurance

Included

Not Included**

Not Included**

Passport (if needed)

$135

$135

Not Needed

Visa or Travel Authority***

$0

$0

$0

Airfare

~$875

~$400

~$150 

Meals Provided

Most

Most

Most

Minimum Recommended Allowance
(for meals, laundry, Internet, souvenirs and extra spending)

$300–$1,300

$300–$525

$150–$525

Laptop Computer Recommended

Maybe

Yes

No

Course Textbooks

$25

$25

Optional, $16

Purchase of In-Country Cell Phone 

~$50

NA

NA

Usefulness of a Cell Phone 

Useful

Not so Useful

Useful

*     Program fee listed is for 2013 programs; the 2014 fees will be finalized by January 2014.
**   Students must provide proof of health insurance. If students don't have health insurance, they can purchase it through ASU Health Services.
*** You will need to double-check to see if you need a Visa or not depending on the country in which your passport was issued. 
  

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